Experimental composer Philip Jeck dies aged 69 - News - Mixmag
Search Menu
Home Latest News Menu
News

Experimental composer Philip Jeck dies aged 69

"A remarkable man and a wonderful artist"

  • Aneesa Ahmed | Photo: Dave Knapik
  • 28 March 2022
Experimental composer Philip Jeck dies aged 69

Philip Jeck, an experimental producer and DJ, has died aged 69 after suffering from a short illness.

The news was announced by the founders of music label Touch in a statement that was posted on Jeck's official website.

They wrote: "Jon and Mike from Touch are deeply saddened to tell you that Philip Jeck died peacefully on Friday after a short illness. A remarkable man and a wonderful artist, he has been one of the kingpins of our work for 30 years.

"But with Philip, it was never just the work, more the love, the spirit and the dedication. He touched so many with his wit, his zest for life and his wisdom. We will miss him terribly and our love goes out to Mary and Louis."

Jeck had won the hearts of many in the underground scene due to his innovative thinking and creative modes of music-making. His career saw 12 albums and other works - all of which were made with broken record players, records, equipment and other added sonic effects. His experimental technique inspired generations of electronic music producers to come.

Philip Jeck studied visual art at Dartington College of Arts. He began working with record players and electronics in the early 1980s, and in addition to his solo concert work, he has composed soundtracks and performed with a variety of dance and theatrical organisations.

Jeck began his musical career in 1995 with the album Loopholes and has collaborated with musicians such as Gavin Bryars, Jaki Liebezeit, and Jah Wobble in addition to his solo work. Mark Fisher, a theorist, praised his work as part of the "hauntology" trend of artists that used recorded musical history in their work.

He started a long partnership with dancer and choreographer Laurie Booth, providing music for his performances, an inspirational trip to New York, where he was dazzled by the track mixing of dance music DJs such as Walter Gibbons and Larry Levan.

Jeck also played live in semi-improvised sets that drew on his large collection of abandoned vinyl, which later served as the foundation for his album recordings. He once said: “I’ve got so many records that, in a way, I’m drawing on pretty well the whole history of music, which is very overwhelming."

[Via: Guardian]

Aneesa Ahmed is Mixmag's Digital Intern, follow her on Twitter

Load the next article
Newsletter 2

Mixmag will use the information you provide to send you the Mixmag newsletter using Mailchimp as our marketing platform. You can change your mind at any time by clicking the unsubscribe link in the footer of any email you receive from us. By clicking sign me up you agree that we may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy. Learn more about Mailchimp's privacy practices here.

Loading...
Loading...
Newsletter 2

Mixmag will use the information you provide to send you the Mixmag newsletter using Mailchimp as our marketing platform. You can change your mind at any time by clicking the unsubscribe link in the footer of any email you receive from us. By clicking sign me up you agree that we may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy. Learn more about Mailchimp's privacy practices here.