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Bulging line-ups risk killing the vibe on the dancefloor

Not all parties have to be like a festival

  • Oliver Payne
  • 25 July 2018
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But it’s rarely taken into account, and ticket sales are the priority most of the time, leaving the night to become stuttered; DJs stopping and starting, disco here, techno there, trance in the next set. Many DJs have staple tracks that sound great when organically emerging from a four- or five-hour set, but cramming that into an hour and a half takes away from what it should be: a steady migration through sounds and feelings. Most can relate to standing in a humongous warehouse just getting into a vibe to then realise that the DJ has to stop and a completely new sound starts up that clashes with the last.

Then there’s the knock-on effect these super-sized events have on smaller nights in the vicinity. With the exclusivity deals put in place, trying to book a big-name within two months of one of these bad boys is nigh-on impossible, and trying to get people to go out when they’ve just splashed £50 on a night two months away is pretty hard, too.

It might be unfair to paint these jumbo events in an entirely negative light. We can all attest to the fact that there’s something magical about a banger going off in a huge laser-filled room, and while they might bank on the big names to sell tickets, this does give promoters space to bring through some up-and-comers or give a relative unknown a residency opening a room.

 
 
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